Tag Archives: holiday

Creamed Corn Casserole – A free recipe

It was the evening before Thanksgiving and I was describing the holiday to my son while driving home from preschool. Jack asked if there would be corn at our dinner.

Our family isn’t a corn family. Occasionally when Costco is selling an eight-pack in the summertime my folks will boil it and serve it on the cob. Creamed corn is definitely not a typical dish on our table.

I looked at several recipes online for creamed corn and most called for either canned corn (gross), or fresh corn. Many recipes listed cream cheese, which I didn’t have. I wasn’t about to brave the grocery store on Thanksgiving eve so I took to my freezer and invented my own creamed corn recipe. I think it’s a hybrid of creamed corn and corn casserole. It’s a little thicker than creamed corn because of the egg, but not as custardy as casserole.

Also, my son had fun helping me make it. I put crackers in a ziploc bag and let him stomp to his heart’s content.

Creamed corn casserole is a simple side dish and is perfect for any holiday table. Bacon grease is the base flavor for this tasty, creamy corn dish.
su-lin via Compfight cc
Ingredients;

  • 2 slices of bacon
  • 1/2 cup finely chopped onion
  • 3 tablespoons butter
  • 2 tablespoons plus 2 teaspoons flour
  • 1/2 cup cream
  • milk
  • 24 oz. frozen corn
  • 1 egg, lightly beaten
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 1 sleeve Ritz crackers, stomped on by a child (food processor works too)

Creamed corn casserole is a simple side dish and is perfect for any holiday table. Bacon grease is the base flavor for this tasty, creamy corn dish.
Stock photo of corn. USDAgov via Compfight cc
Directions:

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Fry up the bacon in a medium sauté pan over medium-high heat. Set aside to munch on later and reserve the bacon grease. Add 2 tablespoons of butter and sauté the onions until soft and translucent, about 5 minutes.

Add flour and stir frequently for about two minutes. Turn heat down to medium. Add cream and stir until thickened. Add milk if mixture is too thick. You want it the consistency of cream sauce. Add salt and pepper to taste.

In a large mixing bowl combine the corn, béchamel sauce and egg until the corn is well coated. Place in a casserole dish.

Wipe the sauté pan clean with a paper towel and melt 1 tablespoon of butter over medium heat. Add the Ritz cracker crumbs and stir frequently for one minute.

Sprinkle  casserole with the cracker crumbs and bake uncovered for 40 minutes or until top is lightly browned.

Creamed corn casserole is a simple side dish and is perfect for any holiday table. Bacon grease is the base flavor for this tasty, creamy corn dish.
More stock corn because we ate ours too fast to photograph. Rich Renomeron via Compfight cc
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DIY Fresh Garland

It’s week two of the Halloween Blog Party with AK Shopgirl and Tessie Style Blog. This week’s theme is “Woodland Creatures.”  We’ll be featuring crafts, costumes, decorations, cocktails and music mixes that represent the fairies, flora and fauna of the forest.

Earlier this week I posted a video tutorial on how to make a fresh flower crown. I’m kicking it up a notch today with a fresh garland to decorate your woodland creatures party or to spruce up your mantle. No video for this tutorial, but I encourage you to watch the time-lapse flower crown tutorial as the technique is similar.

DIY Fresh Garland

DIY fresh garland | Follow this simple tutorial so you can decorate your home with fresh greens all year long. Alaskaknitnat.com

Here’s what you’ll need:

DIY fresh garland | Follow this simple tutorial so you can decorate your home with fresh greens all year long. Alaskaknitnat.com

  • About four feet of twine
  • floral wire (available at crafts stores)
  • Fresh greens such as salal, plumosa ferns and eucalyptus
  • Scissors
  • Wire cutters

Continue reading DIY Fresh Garland

Decorating Eggs with a Toddler – The Last-minute Way

Easter is an unfamiliar holiday for our family, but that doesn’t mean we can’t get creative with hard-boiled eggs.

Pinterest will show you endless egg possibilities but I’m frankly too lazy to attempt most of them. I also don’t have egg dye.

We decided to bust out our $2 water colors and paint our eggs. It turned out to be far less messy than egg dye and our 3-year-old had a great time coloring his eggs.

We baked the eggs to prevent cracking. Then we just set them out in a muffin tin with some water colors and markers and let our son go to town. Fun!

I’ll have a glue, glue Christmas — #10: Pompom ornaments

I recently assessed my yarn stash and quickly came to the conclusion that I have way too much. I’m running out of time to knit and crochet presents for my loved ones and I need to taper down my yarn inventory. Enter the pompom. This perky accessory harkens to my younger years when my clothes were adorned with rick rack and I coveted Tinkerbell peel-off nail polish. 

Pompoms are making a comeback in a big way. Plus, they eat through yarn stashes quickly. This was a great way to decorate my tree and it requires barely any skills. I highly recommend using fabric scissors for this project; otherwise you might find yourself getting callouses in the crotch of your thumbs.

You’ll love the trick to making these ornaments. Look no further than your kitchen utensil drawer.

Pompom ornaments | #10 on Alaska Knit Nat's DIY Holiday Craft Guide

Pompom ornaments — No. 10 in Alaska Knit Nat’s DIY Holiday Craft Guide

What you’ll need:

  • Yarn
  • Large serving fork
  • Sharp scissors

Directions:

Cut a piece of yarn about 16 inches long and fold it in half. Run it in between the middle prong of the fork and hold it securely against the handle. Take up to four strands of yarn at a time and loosely start wrapping around the fork. Do this till you’ve got a whole lotta yarn on there. The more strands you use at a time the faster this will go. Cut the yarn when you think it’s enough. This may take some tinkering.

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Use the yarn you originally placed between the prongs to tie around all the wrapped yarn. Another person’s finger comes in handy, but it’s possible to do this alone. Tie a double knot and slip your uncut pompom off the fork.

Pompom ornaments | #10 on Alaska Knit Nat's DIY Holiday Craft Guide

Pompom ornaments | #10 on Alaska Knit Nat's DIY Holiday Craft Guide

Cut apart all of the loops, being sure not to cut the original strand of yarn as this will be what you’ll hang the ornament from.

Pompom ornaments | #10 on Alaska Knit Nat's DIY Holiday Craft Guide

Trim your pompom as you deem fit. Repeat till you’ve run out of yarn or have worked up an appetite for some microwave nachos.

I’ll have a glue, glue Christmas — #9: Paint chip gift tags

The older I get the less I despise big box hardware stores. Every time I get dragged into one by my husband I treat it as a mission to think of cool ways to reuse hardware supplies. This craft is perfect for the holidays, and free too.

Paint chip gift tags | #9 on Alaska Knit Nat's DIY Holiday Craft Guide

Paint chip gift tags — No. 9 on Alaska Knit Nat’s DIY Holiday Craft Guide

What you’ll need:

  • Paint samples from the hardware store (you can usually get about 3 tags per paint chip)
  • Scissors or a gift tag-shaped paper punch
  • Tiny hole punch or large needle
  • String

Directions:

Cut out the paint samples in the shape of gift tags. Poke a hole in one end and run a six-inch piece of string through the hole. Tie the ends of the string together. Elaborately wrap a gift and add the tag as a finishing touch.

Paint chip gift tags | #9 on Alaska Knit Nat's DIY Holiday Craft Guide

I’ll have a glue, glue Christmas — #7: Quick holiday party snack

I know this is supposed to be a crafty holiday guide, but I had to include this simple treat in the list in case you find yourself needing to provide a snack at an office holiday party. I don’t like baking much and I don’t have the time to create four dozen sugar-coated almond cookies. Grab a bag of pretzel chips and chocolate chips from Costco and dig around your cabinets for some Girl Scout cookies. You won’t be sorry. Chocolate-covered Pretzels with Thin Mint Sprinkles | #7 on Alaska Knit Nat's DIY Holiday Craft Guide

Chocolate-covered pretzels with Thin Mint sprinkles — No. 7 on Alaska Knit Nat’s DIY Holiday Craft Guide

Ingredients:

  • 48 or so Pretzel chips (or regular pretzels)
  • 1 cup of semi-sweet chocolate chips
  • 6 Thin Mint cookies

Directions: Process Thin Mints in a food processor until coarsely ground. Set aside in a bowl. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper. Place 3/4 cups chocolate chips in microwave-safe bowl. Microwave in increments of 30 seconds, stirring in between, until chocolate is melted. Add the remaining 1/4 chocolate chips and stir until melted. Dip half of each pretzel in the chocolate and place on cookie sheet. Sprinkle with a pinch of Thin Mint crumbles. Place cookie sheets in the fridge for 15 minutes or until chocolate is set.

Chocolate-covered Pretzels with Thin Mint Sprinkles | #7 on Alaska Knit Nat's DIY Holiday Craft Guide

I’ll have a glue, glue Christmas — #6: Felt tree garland

There are vastly different ways to trim a Christmas tree. Some prefer the all-white glitter tree, while I love bright colors and a homey hodgepodge of ornaments and garlands.

As I was preparing to trim our tree last week I opened our ornament box and was delighted to find a felt garland I’d constructed last year. I had forgotten about it and it kind of made my day to place it on our tree this year. I love popcorn garlands, but they get pretty messy and i have a toddler who is fascinated with the tree and eating things, so I imagine it wouldn’t last long.

This craft is cheery, colorful and easy. It does require the use of a sewing machine and some monotonous cutting. I recommend putting on “A Christmas Story” or some other holiday film you have memorized and cut out your felt while watching it. Mulled wine could be included, if desired.

DIY Felt Tree Garland | #6 on Alaska Knit Nat's DIY Holiday Craft Guide

Easy felt tree garland: No. 6 on Alaska Knit Nat’s DIY Holiday Craft Guide

  • Craft felt in many different colors (about $5 at Walmart)
  • Fabric scissors (optional but extremely helpful)
  • Sewing machine

Directions:

Fold a piece of felt in fourths and cut out 1-inch circle-ish shapes. Repeat with other felt colors until you have about 300 hundred (I really didn’t count. I just cut out circles until I was sick of it.)

Place all your circles in a bowl and set next to your sewing machine. Start sewing across the diameter of a circle with a straight stitch. When you get to the end of the circle, start sewing through another circle. Repeat this until you’ve run out of circles. You’re basically just lining up the circles side by side and sewing a seam through them to keep them together. I didn’t follow a color pattern, I just sewed them randomly. It doesn’t matter what thread color you use, but I imagine gold thread would look neat. I used white. It’s ok if there are gaps between the circles. If you run out of thread mid-garland, just rethread your machine and sew across the most recently sewn circle.

Wrap your garland around your tree. If it’s too short, make more circles and take your garland back to your sewing machine.

DIY Felt Tree Garland | #6 on Alaska Knit Nat's DIY Holiday Craft Guide

DIY Felt Tree Garland | #6 on Alaska Knit Nat's DIY Holiday Craft Guide