Tag Archives: cranberry

Lowbush Cranberry Tart

The holidays are nigh and it’s time to get creative in the kitchen! Last year for Thanksgiving I served a cranberry curd tart offered up by The New York Times. It was tangy and sweet but the recipe was burdensome, from the peeling of the hazelnuts to pressing the cranberries through a sieve. I thought I’d do my own version for this year’s Thanksgiving table using my own handpicked lowbush cranberries.

Cranberry Tart by Alaska Knit Nat

I opted for a vanilla wafer crust and made a couple of other changes. You can of course use store-bought cranberries and this recipe would turn out just as vividly red and delicious. This is a great alternative to the often-overlooked cranberry sauce.

Harvesting Anchorage: Lowbush Cranberry Marmalade | This is a delicious cranberry orange jam recipe that's perfect for Christmas and holiday gifts for teachers, friends and family. Recipe from Alaskaknitnat.com

Cranberry Tart

Inspired by The New York Times recipe

Cranberry Tart by Alaska Knit Nat

Ingredients for the crust:

  • 60 vanilla wafers
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1/3 cup melted butter

Ingredients for the curd:

  • 12 oz. lowbush cranberries (store bought is fine)
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 orange
  • 1 stick of butter
  • 2 eggs plus 2 egg yolks

Directions for the crust:

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Place wafers in a food processor and pulse until finely ground. Place in a bowl with sugar and melted butter and stir till combined. Press the crumbs into a pie pan and set aside.

Directions for the curd:

Peel the orange with a vegetable peeler and juice the orange. It should be about 1/2 cup of juice. Place juice, peels, cranberries and sugar into a saucepan. Bring to a simmer and let cook for about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally, until berries are popped and softened. Press the berries with the back of a wooden spoon now and then.

Remove the peels and place the mixture into a blender. Blend until smooth. You should have about 2 cups. Pour back into the saucepan with the butter and stir until butter is melted.

Whisk the eggs in a small bowl. Add 1/2 cup or so of cranberry mixture to the eggs to temper them, then mix the eggs back into the saucepan.

Heat over medium-low heat, stirring frequently, until mixture is thickened and nearly bubbling, about 10 minutes. Let mixture cool completely. You can place the curd in the fridge overnight, if you’d like.

Spread the cooled cranberry curd into the pie pan and bake at 350 degrees F for 10 minutes. Let cool.

Cranberry Tart by Alaska Knit Nat

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Harvesting Anchorage: Lowbush Cranberry Marmalade

I know it’s a superb fall when I close my eyes at night and all I see behind my eyelids are lowbush cranberries.

Harvesting Anchorage: Lowbush Cranberry Marmalade | This is a delicious cranberry orange jam recipe that's perfect for Christmas and holiday gifts for teachers, friends and family. Recipe from Alaskaknitnat.comBlood-red jewels hug the mossy ground in my secret south Anchorage picking spot. It must have been the warm May weather that caused patches of usually dormant cranberry bushes to produce large, pea-sized berries.

Harvesting Anchorage: Lowbush Cranberry Marmalade | This is a delicious cranberry orange jam recipe that's perfect for Christmas and holiday gifts for teachers, friends and family. Recipe from Alaskaknitnat.comWhat my family calls lowbush cranberries are, in fact, lingonberries. These short plants can be found in most Anchorage forests. They have round, shiny leaves and if there’s enough sunlight during the summer they bear tart, red berries.

I prefer these to highbush cranberries, which are more watery and have a big, oblong seed in each berry. Lowbush cranberries are opaque and have no seeds. They are also firmer than the highbush variety.

Harvesting Anchorage: Lowbush Cranberry Marmalade | This is a delicious cranberry orange jam recipe that's perfect for Christmas and holiday gifts for teachers, friends and family. Recipe from Alaskaknitnat.comCranberries are my favorite wild berry to pick because they are durable, highly nutritious and they freeze well. They can also be substituted for any recipe that calls for commercial cranberries.

I once again refer to my mama for this segment of “Harvesting Anchorage.” She’s a pro when it comes to cranberry marmalade. The cranberries have so much natural pectin there is no need to add any of the store-bought kind. This simple marmalade is a perfect addition to any breakfast table.

Harvesting Anchorage: Lowbush Cranberry Marmalade | This is a delicious cranberry orange jam recipe that's perfect for Christmas and holiday gifts for teachers, friends and family. Recipe from Alaskaknitnat.comCranberry Orange Marmalade

Harvesting Anchorage: Lowbush Cranberry Marmalade | This is a delicious cranberry orange jam recipe that's perfect for Christmas and holiday gifts for teachers, friends and family. Recipe from Alaskaknitnat.comIngredients:

  • 3 oranges (or 2 oranges and 1 lemon)
  • Water
  • 1/4 tsp. baking soda
  • 8 cups wild lowbush cranberries
  • 4 cups sugar

Directions:

Remove the skins of the oranges in quarters. Cover rinds with water and boil with baking soda for 15 minutes. Shave off as much of the white pith as you can from the rind and slice rind very thin.

Harvesting Anchorage: Lowbush Cranberry Marmalade | This is a delicious cranberry orange jam recipe that's perfect for Christmas and holiday gifts for teachers, friends and family. Recipe from Alaskaknitnat.com

Harvesting Anchorage: Lowbush Cranberry Marmalade | This is a delicious cranberry orange jam recipe that's perfect for Christmas and holiday gifts for teachers, friends and family. Recipe from Alaskaknitnat.comAn alternative method is to use a vegetable peeler to peel off the rind and slice it. If you choose this method you won’t need to boil the rinds since they are so thin.

Harvesting Anchorage: Lowbush Cranberry Marmalade | This is a delicious cranberry orange jam recipe that's perfect for Christmas and holiday gifts for teachers, friends and family. Recipe from Alaskaknitnat.comMeanwhile remove the membrane from each orange segment and reserve the pulp in a bowl. Take the membranes in your hands and squeeze the remaining pulp and juice into the bowl. Discard the membranes. If you’re really lazy you could probably use a couple of cans of mandarins, drained and rinsed. I’ve never tried it, but it could work.

Harvesting Anchorage: Lowbush Cranberry Marmalade | This is a delicious cranberry orange jam recipe that's perfect for Christmas and holiday gifts for teachers, friends and family. Recipe from Alaskaknitnat.comCombine pulp, rinds with their water, cranberries and sugar in a saucepan. Boil, stirring often, skimming off any foam.

Harvesting Anchorage: Lowbush Cranberry Marmalade | This is a delicious cranberry orange jam recipe that's perfect for Christmas and holiday gifts for teachers, friends and family. Recipe from Alaskaknitnat.comLet the mixture boil down and thicken, about 15-18 minutes. Take a spoonful of the mixture and pour it back into the pot. If there are lots of frequent droplets, the mixture isn’t ready yet. If the drips are slow and turn into one big droplet, then it’s ready (that’s called “sheeting”). Turn off the heat and place a tablespoon of liquid in a bowl and place it in the freezer for about 3 minutes.

Remove sample from freezer and tip it slightly. The sample should stay put. If the jam slides around the bowl it means it’s not ready yet. Bring the jam back to a boil and continue stirring constantly for another 5 minutes.

Harvesting Anchorage: Mama's Blueberry Jam | A recipe from alaskaknitnat.comLadle jam into sterilized canning jars with brand-new lids. Fill leaving about 1/4 inch of space at the top. Add the lids and let cool. When you hear little pops that means the lids have sealed. If you’d like more details about canning I recommend this thorough tutorial from The Alaska Urban Soil Project.

Harvesting Anchorage: Lowbush Cranberry Marmalade | This is a delicious cranberry orange jam recipe that's perfect for Christmas and holiday gifts for teachers, friends and family. Recipe from Alaskaknitnat.com

If you’d like a different lowbush cranberry recipe, I recommend my simple cranberry and lemon muffins.

Here are my other recipes from the “Harvesting Anchorage” series:

Harvesting Anchorage: Mama's Blueberry Jam | A recipe from alaskaknitnat.com
Blueberry Jam
Spaghetti & Chicken in a lemon, thyme mushroom sauce | An original recipe from Alaskaknitnat.com
Spaghetti & Chicken in a Lemon Thyme Mushroom Sauce
Harvesting Alaska: Smoked salmon roe | a simple recipe from Alaskaknitnat.com
Smoked Salmon Roe
Harvesting Anchorage: Honey + Wildflower Tea | A profile of Ivan Night, Alaska beekeeper and mead maker
Wildflower tea
Harvesting Anchorage: Wild Rose and Rhubarb Cookies | A recipe from Alaskaknitnat.com
Wild rose and rhubarb cookies
Harvesting Anchorage: Spruce tips | Alaskaknitnat.com
Spruce tip gnocch
Birch tree tapping | Make your own birch syrup | Alaskaknitnat.com
Birch Syrup
Harvesting Anchorage: Devil's Club Pesto | A free recipe from AlaskaKnitNat.com
Devil’s Club Pesto

 

Cranberry Cornbread Stuffing

My sister just cleared out her garden and gave me a gallon bag of fresh sage. In my pursuit to use some of it before drying it I found a great recipe on Foodnetwork.com for Stuffed Pork Chops.

I decided I didn’t feel much like pork chops for dinner, but that cornbread stuffing sounded pretty good. Plus, I have three gallons of cranberries I need to figure out how to use.

I picked up a Costco rotisserie chicken, made some glazed carrots and I had a mini-Thanksgiving in no time at all.

Cranberry Cornbread Stuffing | Alaska Knit Nat

I reheated the chicken in the oven 20 minutes before taking out the stuffing (or dressing in this case) and it made enough juice for some tasty gravy.

Ingredients:
2.5 cups crumbled cornbread
2 slices of bacon, chopped
1 Tbs. butter
2 celery ribs, chopped fine
1/2 onion, chopped fine
2 garlic cloves, minced
6 baby portobello mushrooms, sliced
1 Tbs. chopped parsley
1 Tbs. chopped sage
1 Tbs. chopped rosemary
1/4 cup dried or fresh cranberries
1/4 cup golden raisins
1/2 cup chicken stock
Salt and pepper to taste

Directions:
Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

In a heavy skillet, start browning the bacon. Add the celery, onion, garlic and mushrooms and cook till bacon is fully cooked, about 10 minutes. Add the parsley, sage, rosemary (sorry, no thyme) and cook another couple of minutes. Salt and pepper to taste.

In a bowl, toss together the cornbread, cranberries and raisins. Add the rest of the ingredients including the chicken stock and gently toss to combine.

Transfer to a casserole dish and top with little bits of butter.

Cover and bake for 50 minutes.