Quick Craft: Coffee Filter Flower

I stayed home sick today and I hate wasting my time in bed, so I decided to mildly craft out. I really love tissue paper flowers but I don’t like spending a ton of time cutting out paper. I found this neat tutorial last year for making coffee filter flowers and I thought I’d take it a step further. I dyed the coffee filters with food coloring and water, let them air dry, and then made them with pipe cleaners as the stem. By using coffee filters I didn’t have to cut the paper to shape. I just shaped the petals, which is far quicker. They really turned out splendidly, don’t you think?

DIY Coffee Filter Flowers -- A step-by-step guide from Alaska Knit Nat

DIY Coffee Filter Flowers -- A step-by-step guide from Alaska Knit Nat

 

Materials:

DIY Coffee Filter Flowers | Alaska Knit Nat

White coffee filters

Red food coloring

Liquid medicine syringe or eye dropper

Scissors

Pipe cleaners

Floral tape

Floral wire

 

Directions:

DIY Coffee Filter Flowers | Alaska Knit Nat

You’ll be using 12 filters per flower. Fill a small cup with water and about 7 drops of food coloring. Place a few filters at a time onto a plate. With the syringe or eye dropper randomly drop the water all over the filters. Flip them over and do the other side. It’s up to you how much white you want to leave. Hang dry them. Or I guess you could use a hair dryer, but I don’t own one.

DIY Coffee Filter Flowers | Alaska Knit Nat

When filters are dry, take six at a time and fold them in half three times and cut out a heart shape to make the petals. I cut more off of one set of six. These will be the inside petals.

DIY Coffee Filter Flower | Alaska Knit Nat

Rough up the edges of the petals with your scissors. Cut a teeny tiny bit off the point of the filters to create a small hole in each filter.

DIY Coffee Filter Flower | Alaska Knit Nat
Inner petals (left) and outer petals

 

Repeat with second set of six filters, but don’t cut off as much. These will be your outer petals.

DIY Coffee Filter Flower | Alaska Knit Nat

Take your pipe cleaner and create a little nub at one end. Take one sheet of your smaller filter and thread it up to the nub. Wrap the bottom of the filter all around the nub to cover it and secure with floral tape. This way you won’t be able to see the center of the flower.

DIY Coffee Filter Flower | Alaska Knit Nat

DIY Coffee Filter Flower | Alaska Knit Nat

Thread the next filter onto the pipe cleaner and scrunch it around the nub. Repeat with one filter at a time till you’ve put on all the small filters.

DIY Coffee Filter Flower | Alaska Knit Nat

Scrunch around the base of the flower and wrap with floral tape. You’ll now have a small flower and you could call it a day, but I want a huge peony.

DIY Coffee Filter Flowers | Alaska Knit Nat

Take one larger filter and thread it on the pipe cleaner, but don’t shove it all the way up. Give it a little space so the outer petals are just a little longer than the inner petals. Repeat with the remaining filters. Scrunch up around the base of the flower and secure with floral tape.

DIY Coffee Filter Flowers | Alaska Knit Nat

Cut a 6-inch piece of floral wire and fold it in half, or just use another pipe cleaner. Stick it to the main stem and continue wrapping with floral tape. This stabilizes the stem. Keep wrapping all the way to the bottom.

DIY Coffee Filter Flowers | Alaska Knit Nat

DIY Coffee Filter Flowers | Alaska Knit Nat

Break tape and wrap the bottom of the stem. Ta-da!

DIY Coffee Filter Flowers -- A step-by-step guide from Alaska Knit Nat

These flowers look cheery on a window sill year-round. Peony season is on the way, but I just couldn’t wait. These will definitely do in the meantime.

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2 thoughts on “Quick Craft: Coffee Filter Flower”

  1. Reblogged this on Paper Peony and commented:
    Spring is almost here and we at Paper Peony can barely control our excitement for peony season. Here’s a post from Natasha’s craft blog Alaska Knit Nat on how you can make your own paper peonies…from coffee filters!

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