Tag Archives: winter

An ode to Anchorage snow

Anchorage winters have changed. When I was younger I remember making snow forts, sledding and snowmen. On Halloween I’d have to wear a snow suit over my costume (or choose a warm costume such as a bear or a flapper girl moose). I remember yearning for the city plowers to pile a mountain of snow at the top of our driveway (we were at the cusp of a different subdivision so the city plows would stop at our house and leave all the extra snow in our driveway, much to my dad’s distress).

It's beginning to look a lot like winter | An ode to Anchorage snow by Natasha Price of Alaskaknitnat.com
Christmas photo outtake, circa 1995
It's beginning to look a lot like winter | An ode to Anchorage snow by Natasha Price of Alaskaknitnat.com
Building a snow tunnel, 2008
It's beginning to look a lot like winter | An ode to Anchorage snow by Natasha Price of Alaskaknitnat.com
Former northernmost Hooters in the United States. Yep, I’m in there.
It's beginning to look a lot like winter | An ode to Anchorage snow by Natasha Price of Alaskaknitnat.com
Walking down 4th Avenue in Anchorage, 2006

The past few years have been much different. There’s no more snow. The famous Iditarod sled dog race start was relocated to snowier Fairbanks last year. It’s just lame – the cold with no snow. My mother-in-law bought our son an amazing wagon with interchangeable sled runners. We eagerly installed them two years ago and never used it.

I’m not the only one bemoaning the changes. Anchorage’s mayor said that street lighting in inadequate these days because we used to rely on the snow’s reflection to see better during the dark winter months. Ski races have been postponed and cancelled.

It’s a real bummer when you have a small child who wants so badly to participate in winter activities.

But yesterday, finally, we got a few inches of the fluffy white stuff. Our son couldn’t have been more thrilled. I mean, LOOK at the joy in his little face:

It's beginning to look a lot like winter | An ode to Anchorage snow by Natasha Price of Alaskaknitnat.com

So here’s to a real, bona fide Anchorage winter. Let’s get some more snow now!

Brioche Turban — A Free Pattern

I’ve been all about the brioche stitch lately. Ever since I found a left-handed video tutorial on HandsOccupied.com, I’ve been hooked! It’s really a simple stitch, involving yarn overs and slipped stitches and best of all (no offense to my good friend Annie) it involves absolutely no purling!

In just a week I’ve made two scrumptious, fluffy cowls and I felt ready to experiment with the stitch.

I put together this simple turban headband in just a day’s worth of mindless knitting. It went together quickly and with minimal effort.

I highly recommend checking out this gal’s tutorial, as it makes more sense to see this easy stitch in action than it is to read it.

Brioche Turban | Free Knitting Pattern from Alaska Knit Nat

Brioche Stitch Turban

Materials:

1 skein of worsted weight yarn (I used Red Heart Boutique Treasure in the Watercolors colorway)

Size US 10 straight needles

Darning needle

safety pins (optional)

Brioche Turban | Free Knitting Pattern from Alaska Knit Nat

Brioche stitch:

Cast on 10 stitches.

Foundation row: YO before you even start knitting (this is the strange part where it’s easier to understand visually), slip the first stitch purlwise, k1. Repeat YO, sl 1 pw, k1 till the end of the row.

Row 2: *YO, sl 1 pw, knit the 2 criss-cross stitches together. Repeat * to end of row.

Repeat row 2 till work measures about 40 inches, or a few inches less than twice the circumference of your head. It helps to “try on” the turban as you’re knitting it as your yarn’s stretchiness may be different from mine (see assembly instructions below).

Bind off all stitches. Cut yarn leaving an 18-inch tail.

Assembly:

Here’s a rough demonstration of how to assemble the turban using a sash since I’d already constructed mine by the time I wrote this post.

Brioche Turban | Free Knitting Pattern from Alaska Knit Nat

Start with the middle of the strip at the nape of your neck and wrap the ends toward the top of your head. Twist the ends of the strip around twice and bring them back down toward the nape of your neck. Pin ends together.

Carefully remove the turban and pin together the long edges where they meet from the center loop toward the back of the headband. Using the 18-inch tail of yarn, thread a darning needle and sew together the short ends that you first pinned. Starting at the center back toward the front knot, sew together the long ends from underneath, running the needle through the wrong side stitches.

Brioche Turban | Free Knitting Pattern from Alaska Knit Nat

You can be as messy as you like because you won’t be able to see these stitches. Stitch together the long sides until you’re two inches away from the center knot. Tie off the yarn and weave in the end. Take a new 18-inch piece of yarn and sew on the other side of the turban in the same way, from the back seam toward the center knot. Here’s a crummy drawing of where the stitches should go:

Brioche Turban | Free Knitting Pattern from Alaska Knit Nat

Remove all the pins, place on your head and admire how awesome you are for making a functional piece of clothing.

Brioche Turban | Free Knitting Pattern from Alaska Knit Nat