Category Archives: Knit & Crochet

Cotton Candy

Pickles has done it again — inspired me to make something different and awesome. Springtime is right around the corner, but for us Alaskans, this time means anything from sunny cold days to whipping wind. Nothing is more appropriate than the Simple Luxury Scarf (or as I’m calling it, the Cotton Candy). It’s light and airy, delicate and soft. It’s perfectly bulky and squishy.

I used a combination of Cascade Yarn’s acrylic aran and some Rowan mohair/silk combo. The affordable price of the Cascase made up for the expensive mohair.

I learned my lesson on this project never to buy cheap needles. I bought some long, plastic 15 circular needles the other day and this was my first time using them. They broke halfway through my project. Thanks to a shoddy hot glue gun, I was uncomfortably able to finish, and I am happy I did.

Pickles’ pattern is pretty straightforward. I have yet to understand grams instead of meters or yards. I used one 100g ball of Cascade, about 240 yards, and one 25g ball of mohair, about 220 yards. The pattern calls for two 50 g balls of mohair but the 25g ball was perfect for my one ball of aran. I only had about 12 inches of mohair left when I finished the project. The other thing that wasn’t really explained was the reason for the final K3M1 row. I wasn’t sure if it was M1F like I’d been doing the whole time, but I just did a regular make one and it created a pretty decorative edge.

Definitely a project worth doing again and again.

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Kasandra Gloves

My friend Kasandra requested a pair of long, fingerless gloves because her classroom gets really chilly in the winter. I decided to alter my Cabled Gauntlets pattern for her.

I used the same yarn, Universal Yarn Classic Shades, but there were a couple of things I did differently. First, I cast on 37 stitches instead of 36. This way the moss stitch is created without having to change the pattern of the stitch every time you get back to the beginning of the round. When I was finished with the moss stitch and was ready to start the cable pattern, I just knit two stitches together and carried on my way. Second (and most obvious), I extended the cable pattern. I did seven cables before starting on the gusset. Third, I knit a couple of more rows after joining the thumb. I think I did rows 1-6 one more time and then started the moss stitch, at which point I created one stitch to make 37 as I did in the beginning. And last, I made the thumb three rows tall with three rows of moss stitch.
Kasandra got them in the mail today and said, “It was love at first sight.” I guess she likes them!

Charcoal + Teal = Lovely New Hat

My boss needed a new hat since he must have shrunk his other one. He usually goes for what a small group of us calls “hot-boy green,” but this time he wanted a turquoise and grey hat.

Yarn used: Bernat Roving, flint color
Loops & Threads Charisma, electric blue color

Made on size 10 needles, 72 stitches in the round, six rows of K2P2 ribbing, 32 rows tall before decreasing.

My Heart Goes out to Fairbanks Hat

This is one of my loveliest hats to date. It’s based closely on the From Norway With Love pattern from www.pickles.no.

I first followed Pickles’ pattern exactly, but I must have bought too thin of yarn because it turned out baby.
It is a very very cute baby hat, but I wanted one for me! So I went with my gut, which I should have done in the first place, and tweaked the pattern to fit my own hat patterns. The biggest problem I had with Pickles’ pattern was the heart chart. When I thought less about the chart, the hearts turned out perfectly. I used the chart as a guide for where to place the hearts and how many stitches they were made of, but I stopped counting row by row and it worked out better. Somehow her chart didn’t seem quite right.
The hat is made in sets of 10 stitches. The base of the heart (one stitch) occurs every 10 stitches, so when you start the first row of hearts, start the pattern by knitting 4 in the main color, k1 in the heart color, k9 in the main color, k1 in the heart color, k9 in the main color, k1 in the heart color and so on. When you get all the way around you’ll see your first heart color stitch. With the heart color, k1 before that stitch, k1 on top of that stitch, and k1 after that stitch. Row by row you add one heart color stitch on either end of the heart till there are 7 stitches (so, 1, 3, 5, 7). Knit two rows of 7 heart stitches and then the rest of the heart chart will make sense.
Once you’ve finished the first row of hearts, you immediately start the second row by knitting 9 in the main color, K1 in the 2nd heart color, 9 in the main color and so on. Basically the heart pattern alternates every 5 stitches so they fit in between each other.
This pattern is a great introduction to Fair Isle patterns because you carry the unused colors along with you as you knit. In other words, if you knit 4 stitches in the main color and then switch to the heart color, you carry the heart color on the inside of the work. Here’s what the hat looks like inside out:
The most difficult thing about knitting hats like this is making sure to keep the unused yarn loose in the back of the work. If you carry over the yarn too tightly, your hat will be super scrunched up and won’t fit over your head. My solution to this is when I’m carrying yarn over more than three stitches, I place my finger under the yarn so it leaves a gap and knit a couple of stitches with my finger in place behind the work. It might look really loose, but it will tighten up when you wear it. If you’re carrying the yarn over 1-3 stitches, just try not to knit very tightly. It just takes practice, so you might end up knitting a beautiful baby hat for someone.
Whew! At long last, here is the pattern
My Heart Goes Out to Fairbanks Hat
Ingredients:
Size 7 circular needle, 16″ long
2-5 colors of Lamb’s Pride worsted yarn, one skein each
one set of size 7 double points
darning needle
Important Abbreviations:
MC = Main Color
HC1 = Heart Color 1
HC2 = Heart Color 2
K2tog = knit two stitches together
Heart Chart:
Note: I honestly believe the tan heart in this pattern is not correct. The second row from the top, on the far right, that should be a white square, not tan
Directions:
With MC, cast on 100 stitches. Place a marker and connect the round without twisting the yarn. K2, P2 for two inches, or till brim is a width of your liking.
K 2 rows
Next row: With MC, K4 stitches. *With HC1, K1 stitch. With MC, K9 stitches.* Repeat * till you get back to the place marker.
Next row: With MC, knit to two stitches before the first HC1 stitch. *With HC1, K3 stitches. With MC, K7 stitches.* Repeat * to end of row. (NOTE — this is a very visual project. It’s hard to write out the directions. Just keep in mind that once you see the first stitch of the heart, that you’ll be expanding the size of the heart in the following row. My written instructions may not be exactly correct.)
Next row: With MC, knit to two stitches before the previous row’s first HC1 stitch. *With HC1, K5 stitches. With MC, K5 stitches.* Repeat * till end of round.
Next row: With MC, knit to two stitches before the previous row’s first HC1 stitch. *With HC1, K7 stitches. With MC, K3 stitches.* Repeat * till end of round.
Next row: With MC, knit to the stitch before the previous row’s first HC1 stitch.  *With HC1, K7 stitches. With MC, K3 stitches.* Repeat * till end of round. (This row you aren’t expanding the heart. You are knitting the same heart stitches as the previous row.)
Next row: With MC, knit to one stitch before the previous row’s first HC1 stitch. *With HC1, K3. With MC, K1. With HC1, K3. With MC, K3.* Repeat * till end of round.
Next row (top of heart): With MC, knit to one stitch before the previous row’s HC1. *With MC, K1. With HC1, K1. With MC, K3. With HC1, K1. With MC, K5.* Repeat * till end of round. Cut HC1 leaving an 8-inch tail.
Immediately the next round: *With MC, K9. With HC2, K1.* Repeat * till end of round. Follow the same instructions above for creating the HC2 hearts. Refer to the chart, keeping in mind it’s flawed in the second to the last row from the top of the heart.
Create 4 sets of heart patterns. Make 5 sets if you want a tall sort of floppy hat.
K 2 rows using the MC yarn.
Decrease pattern:
First, you need to change your hat to be in multiples of 8, so in the next row, K2tog four times somewhat evenly through the row. Every 20 stitches or so I K2tog. You won’t be able to notice this row in the end. You should end up with 96 stitches.
Next row: *K2tog, K6.* Repeat * till end of row.
Next row: K one round
Next row: *K2tog, K5.* Repeat * till end of row.
Next row: K one round
Next row: *K2tog, K4.* Repeat * till end of row.
Next row: K one round
Next row: *K2tog, K3.* Repeat * till end of row.
Next row: K one round and transfer to double points while knitting this row.
Next row: *K2tog, K2.* Repeat * till end of row.
Next row: K one round
Next row: *K2tog, K1.* Repeat * till end of row.
Next row: K one round
Next row: *K2tog.* Repeat * till end of row.
You should have 12 stitches. If you have 24, repeat the last round again.
Cut yarn leaving a 12-inch tail and loop through the remaining stitches. Cinch it up and weave in the ends. I tied the heart color ends together and snipped them instead of taking all the time to weave them in.

 

Crocheted Ornaments

Never did I think crocheting would look attractive, especially in Christmas ornament form. I guess it all depends on the yarn, but I’ve been having fun making these. I’ve included my pattern below, but if you want a real pro’s pattern, visit my favorite crochet artist’s  Ornament Tutorial.
Here’s our little tree.

I don’t know what size hook I used, nor do I know how to write crochet patterns, but here’s sort of how I made them.

Make 2 of the following pattern:

Round 1: Chain 5 and form into a loop. Chain 2 and DC into loop 11 times (12 spokes). Join to 2nd stitch of first chain. Bind off.
Round 2: Between two of the spokes, bring in new color and Chain 2. DC once into the same space, DC twice in every other chain space (24 spokes). Join to 2nd stitch of first chain. Bind off.
Round 3: In a space between two sets of two spokes, bring in new color and chain 3. DC twice more into same space, skip 2 spokes and DC 3 times in the bigger space. Repeat till end of round. Join to 3rd stitch of first chain. Bind off. (If making a small size, skip to round 5).
Round 4: In space between two sets of three spokes, bring in new color. Chain 3 then DC three times into same space. Skip next 3 spokes and DC four times in the bigger space. Repeat till end of round. Join to 3rd stitch of first chain. Bind off.
Round 5: With wrong sides facing from both circles, join with new color by inserting hook into an outer stitch of both circles and pulling yarn through to the front. Single chain each stitch (not in between the spokes like the other rounds, but into the stitch on the outside of the round). Make sure to go through both circles with each single chain. Repeat SC till there’s about 2 inches of open space left between the two circles. Place a little bit of stuffing inside till it’s stuffed to your liking. Finish off the SC border. Join to first stitch of the round then chain for 4 inches to make a loop. Join to the beginning of the chain. Weave in ends.